Panamanian dating culture


30-Jun-2017 07:57

Please ask if you would like additional photos or more in-depth descriptions. All items being offered on this website have appropriate provenance and are legal to buy and own under the United States statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, Chapter 14. 5 — Peru 400 AD - 600 AD An attractive Nazca figural stirrup vessel from ancient Peru. An elegant form; the vessel is round-bottomed and has an elliptical body with sharp shoulder and flared spout. The break lines have been restored and are slightly visible. Water was a precious commodity in ancient Peru and often depicted in their art. Across the upper torso is a feathered cloak along with feathered headdress and back assemblage. 00 — Peru 700 BC - 100 BC A large and attractive pottery bowl from the early Paracas culture of southern coastal Peru. Around the top and back are wide bands of interlocking angular designs, likely representing a textile head wrap. A wide strap handle connects from the spout to the upper shoulder. A small chip at the rim of the spout has been restored, otherwise intact and original. Decorated in a variety of symbolic and geometric patterns. For additional info and a photo of a nearly identical example, reference page 103, image 212, of "Seeing with New Eyes" Highlights from the Michael C. He wears a large headdress, likely representing a stylized bird. The degree of adornment indicates this individual is of high ranking social status. — Costa Rica - Panama 1000 AD - 1500 AD A lovely pedestal bowl from the border area of Costa Rica and Panama - Diquis Zone, dating to the Chirique Phase, Period VI. The Omereque (also referred to as Mizque and Nazcoide) were a subculture of the Tiwanaku (Tiahuanaco). All are approx 2.5" tall Top, center figure is — Peru 300 AD - 500 AD A large Moche ear spool from ancient Peru. 0 — Peru 900 AD - 1100 AD An adorable Chimu dog stirrup vessel from the North Coast region of ancient Peru. 5 — Peru 350 AD - 600 AD A Moche Canchero from Peru. 0 — Mexico 300 BC - 100 BC A Chupicuaro tripod rattle vessel. Deposits and root marks present, mostly on the underside. The elegant form shows strong Teotihuacan influence. 5 — Costa Rica 1200 AD - 1500 AD A nicely painted Nicoya figure from ancient Costa Rica. His face is expressive with pointed chin and elongated coffee bean eyes. Completely intact and original with no repairs or restoration. The collection includes vessels, human and animal figures, a tiny mace head and three working whistles . Grayware terracotta with a nicely burnished surface. It will whistle loudly by blowing across the opening, much like one would 'play' a glass soda bottle. The blackware surface is nicely burnished and shows considerable deposits and root marks. They are curious and mischievous animals that were kept as household pets by the Maya and are sometimes depicted in their art. A tapering stirrup handle with a short spout typical of the type and period. This is a large and unusual type of Colima figure that is only found in the Coahuayana Valley region. At the top is a step-fret pattern, below that is a thin band of elongated trophy heads. These roller stamp sellos are deeply carved and show geometric and mythological zoomorphic designs. Rounded lower chamber with a concentric (graduated) stepped form, topped by a seated figure playing a pan flute. Heavily adorned; he wears an elaborate jewelry assemblage: a large spherical nose-piece, huge ear spools and a perctoral. - 5 — Western Mexico 200 BC - 200 AD An unusual Michoacan standing female figure. Collected pre-1970 5 — Peru 1100 AD - 1450 AD A collection of five Chancay harpoon points. This being a very early example of a gadrooned, plant-fruit form vessel. Rounded bottom, carved with repeating geometric designs. Some minor fading to the black paint, otherwise completely intact and choice. Approx 6" across x 3.75" tall 5 — Mexico 600 AD - 900 AD Published Veracruz Nopiloa maternal figure dating to the Late Classic Period. She wears an elaborate headdress along with beaded necklace and bracelets. Ample deposits and areas of wear as would be expected.Every purchase comes with a written certificate of authenticity (COA) and are fully guaranteed to be as described. Shipping options are USPS Priority Mail, UPS Ground and Fed Ex. — Costa Rica - Panama 1000 AD - 1500 AD A large two-handled olla from the border area of Costa Rica and Panama - Diquis Zone, dating to the Chirique Phase, Period VI. The surface is highly burnished and polychrome painted in natural tones of cream, red, purple, orange, brown and black. The top of the vessel is nicely decorated (a rare feature) with carved vertical lines and triangular patterns filled with pierced dots. Assembled from four large pieces and a dozen or more smaller shards with breaks restored inside and out. Despite considerable restoration, it appears intact and displays beautifully on a custom metal ring stand that is included. A rare example from a time just prior to the collapse of the Maya civilization. The vessel sits on a slightly rounded bottom and is topped by an arching stirrup handle with slightly flared spout, indicative of Phase III. A small area of damage to the spout has been restored, otherwise it is intact and original. At the back is a third tripod (support) leg and above that is the mouthpiece for an internal whistle. Beautifully decorated with a wide band of incised angular designs around most of the outer rim. The cheeks have additional incising that indicate facial tattooing or ritual scarification in the woven mat motif suggesting this individual was of the elite ruling class. 15 original pieces with restored break lines and small losses replaced. A large area of fire-clouding and surface discoloration on one side and the bottom. An exceptional example that is masterfully crafted. Prominently featured at the top is a band of stylized jaguars and plumed serpents. These being rendered upside-down is symbolically important and is thought to imply that the bottom register is depicting a scene from the Underworld; an inversion of the earthly realm above and symbolically suggests a sense of duality. The raised ring, just above the base has been partially restored, otherwise completely intact and original with no chips, cracks or breaks. At his side is a (conjoined) standing llama with elongated body. Almost certainly he is a shaman or a person of great importance. — West Mexico 100 BC - 250 AD A nice pair of Jalisco female figures. An elegant shape with a flared pedestal base and a sharply angled bowl. The upper shoulder of the bowl is decorated with finely incised linear and stippled geometric patterns. A relatively unknown culture, their pottery is exceptionally well crafted and beautifully painted in colors and styles very similar to the neighboring Tiwanaku, but their wares are typically more refined in their execution. Antara 1 is — Costa Rica - Panama 1000 AD - 1500 AD An adorable terracotta deer effigy vessel from the border area of Costa Rica and Panama - Diquis Zone, dating to the Chirique Phase, Period VI. Hollow construction with a domed front showing an avian motif. The dog is realistically sculpted, nicely detailed and sits atop a box-shaped (cube) lower chamber. — West Mexico 100 BC - 250 AD A medium-large redware phytomorphic vessel from the Colima region of ancient West Mexico. Sometimes referred to as corn-poppers based on their form, they were actually used as ceremonial water dippers by the ancient Moche. 0 — Peru 400 AD - 700 AD A nice Moche pottery trumpet from ancient Peru, dating to Phase IV. The long, hollow tubular body is curved (looped) at the top, ending with the mouth-piece. Bi-chrome painted in red and cream with three sets of chevrons radiating outward from the center along with pairs of wavy lines. Displays well on the custom metal stand which is included as shown. The sides are nearly vertical and flare slightly at the rim. 00 — Costa Rica - Panama 1000 AD - 1500 AD An adorable bird vessel from the border area of Costa Rica and Panama (Diquis Zone) dating to the Chirique Phase, Period VI. It depicts a seated figure with hands resting on the knees, polychrome painted with linear designs in shades of red and brown against a cream ground. 0 — Ecuador 300 BC - 300 AD An unusual avian motif pottery rattle sculpture from the Manabi Province of ancient Ecuador. Some light surface wear, scrapes and minor imperfections as would be expected. See Klein and Cevallos "Ecuador - The Secret Art of Pre Columbian Ecuador" for additional scholarly information on ancient Manteno art and culture. A very diverse grouping with examples ranging from the early cultures of Mexico, down through Central America to later cultures of Peru. Flat bottom with rounded body and tapered neck topped by a large inverted rim with incised decoration and a scalloped edge. In good condition with some rim restoration and the tip of the handle restored, otherwise intact. There is a similar example of this type on display at the Davis Museum and Cultural Center of Wellesley College in Massachusetts. The highly burnished orange-red surface shows calcified deposits and mineralization, heavy in some areas. This example is constructed of buff terracotta and is in very good condition. The lightly burnished gray surface has a large area of (almost black) fire-clouding. For comparable examples of this exact type, as well as additional scholarly information, see "Sculpture of Ancient West Mexico", by Kan, Meighan & Nicholson, page 141. Minor restoration to a very small part the figure's right eye and eyebrow, otherwise intact and original. The central design element is a wide band of highly stylized stingrays. The exterior of the vessel has some light paint enhancements and there is a shallow one inch pock-mark in the bottom, but it is completely intact with no breaks or cracks. Two of them still have scattered remains of yellow pigment in the crevices. One has a few minor chips and another shows light erosion on one side, but overall they are intact and are fine examples. The figure is nicely adorned with ear spools and a wide pointed collar, likely representing feathers. The figure has been reattached at the legs and the break restored. See page 209, plate 122 of Klein and Cevallos "Ecuador - The Secret Art of Pre Columbian Ecuador" for a comparable example and additional scholarly information. 9" tall x 6" across 00 — Ecuador 500 BC - 500 AD A choice Jamacoaque pottery vessel featuring a matched pair of conjoined bowls. He is shown wearing a complex headdress with two-pronged horn on top, long side flaps down the back and cone-shaped nodes on the frontal ridge. — Peru 900 BC - 500 BC Early stone items from the Chavin culture of Northern Peru. Unlike the more common "pretty lady" type, the form is more stylized. These wooden barbed points would have been lashed to longer shafts and were most likely used for fishing in the rivers and coastal waters. A type that later evolved into the more realistic and refined 'pumpkin' vessels. Above that, deeply corseted sides are carved with a stylized woven "mat" pattern. Black painted decoration on the headdress and body. The figure contains numerous rattle balls and a whistle in the base. A fine and rare example with excellent published provenance. Approx 9" tall x 6.5" across 00 — West Mexico 300 BC- 200 AD A nice terracotta bowl from Jalisco, West Mexico. The lightly burnished surface is a creamy yellow-orange with a red stripe just below the rim. 7" across x 5" tall 0 — Mexico 500 BC - 100 BC A lovely Chupicuaro brownware pottery bowl.Leg breaks could be restored for an additional charge. 8" across x 3" tall - 0 Bowl #3 (Bottom), Small bowl that sits on a footed pedestal base and with gently flared sides. Most interestingly it has (rarely seen) ancient restoration where by the cracked bowl was drilled and tied to extend its usefulness in ancient times. Several restored breaks, but the ancient drills holes remain along with the associating crack. For additional info on this motif see "A Sourcebook of Nazca Ceramic Iconography" by Donald Proulx, Page 190 - 191 Approx. 5 — Peru 1150 AD - 1400 AD Chimu blackware vessel in the form of a lobster. 5 — Costa Rica 1200 AD - 1500 AD A nice tripod vessel from the Diquis Region of Costa Rica dating to the Chiriqui Phase. An excellent example that displays well on a custom metal display stand which is included as shown. Two small areas of fire-clouding, one on the head and another on the dome. The interior is blackened with soot build up from use in ancient times. 0 — Costa Rica - Panama 1000 AD - 1500 AD Three fine Tarrago vessels from the border area of Costa Rica and Panama (Diquis Zone) dating to the Chirique Phase, Period VI. Deeply incised lines in the bottom surrounded by a wide band of red-orange paint. The artifacts have been pinned to the backing for easy removal.The crustation sits with claws around a domed base. The vessel has a lightly burnished surface and light deposits. A single stress crack that ran across the bottom and partially up both sides has been stabilized and restored. This type, sometimes referred to as "chocolate pots," have tall tripod support legs. A minor repair to the rim of the spout, otherwise intact. A remarkable example and rarely seen, especially in this condition. All are well made, thin walled examples of "bisque ware" pottery, typical of that region. Overall a great assortment of ancient textiles and weaving related artifacts. Frame is approx 17" tall x 13" across 0 — Guatemala, El Salvador 200 AD - 800 AD Tall, slender Maya plain ware cylinder with two incised lines around the top, but otherwise undecorated.The cheeks and lower jaw are covered in wide bands indicating facial tattoos. The body and lower legs are decorated with linear and wavy striped patterns representing woven armor. 217 for a very similar example and additional scholarly information. 16.5" tall x 7.75" across 50 — Peru 800 AD - 1200 AD Three ceremonial tumi knives from ancient Peru. The head of the peccary is realistically sculpted and there's a short tail at the rear. One end is decorated with concentric half-circles; the other end has a row of triangles. The bottom shows 'free-form' brushed designs in groups of three. Assembled from six large shards and a dozen or so smaller pieces. He wears ear spools and a head wrap with pierced holes around the top of the vessel. 9" tall x 8" across 50 — Mexico 600 AD - 1000 AD An exceedingly rare Zapotec effigy vessel in the form of a bat claw (foot) from the Monte Alban region of Central Mexico. Buff terracotta construction, nicely painted with geometric designs and stylized sea birds. The rim is decorated with angular and circular forms thought to represent sea dwellers. Ai Apaec is shown here wearing a jaguar headdress and serpent waist wrap (belt). — Peru 1250 AD - 1450 AD Two Inca (Inka) copper axes from the Central Peruvian Highlands. A larger one flanked by 2 medium sized ones are displayed on a custom metal stand. A lovely example from a seldom seen Bolivian culture. The upper half of the vessel is intricately carved. 0 — Ecuador 600 BC - 300 BC A very rare Chorrera erotic whistle vessel from ancient Ecuador. 5 — West Mexico 300 BC - 300 AD Two partial obsidian pectorals. Both flutes are in playable condition with nice tones and have two pierced holes used for suspension around the neck. The face is framed with large slab panels that create a massive headdress. He wears elaborate regalia; the headdress features opposing birds with heads turned backward. 0 — Vera Cruz, Mexico 600 AD - 900 AD A rare and exceptional Sonriente figure from the Remojadas region of ancient Veracruz. 17.5" x 9.5" 5 — West Mexico 200 BC - 400 AD A large Nayarit plate (shallow bowl) from ancient West Mexico. 0 — Mexico 400 AD - 750 AD A Teotihuacan tripod vessel from ancient Mexico. The three gracefully curving legs are decorated with stylized bird heads with long beaks, likely representing the heads of pelicans. A chip on the spout is restored, but it is otherwise intact. A few minor scrapes and dings along with light deposits (consistent with age) as would be expected. Smaller than most of this type, but is a really cute piece that displays well. Some light surface erosion, mainly on the ears and along the bottom. The group contains celt forms, chisels, axes and scrapers. A nice selection of ancient utilitarian stone tools. The elongated snout indicates these are most certainly representations of caimans or possibly alligators. The outer boarder shows stylized glyphs and centipedes. Tripod 1 (left) - Orange terracotta with areas of fire clouding. Tripod 2 (right) - Tan (buff) terracotta with some fire clouding. The vessel sits atop a footed base and has a wide strap handle. Condition is quite good, a hole in the back (under the handle) and rediating cracks have been restored otherwise intact. A wide band of incised geometric forms decorate the midsection and up the back. All are round, spherical shapes and are decorated with two small zoomorphic adornos. The headdress is incised across the forehead and flows gracefully over the head and down the shoulders. These rare figural ollas are attributed to the late period, Southern Maya. Several chips along the base, but is otherwise intact with no repairs or restoration. Adorned with circular ear spools and a necklace of graduated disk beads. This very rare mirror dates to the Wairajirca-Kotosh Period. His arms are raised in a gesture which indicates he is in an induced state of shamanic transformantion. The fruits are accented with red and black stripes delicately painted over a backround of cream slip. Condition is somewhat poor with moderate to heavy restoration. During such altered states of consciousness, shamans would communicate with spiritual beings as well as the deceased, and travel on shamanic journeys in the supernatural realm. Nicely carved from a greenish-gray stone in the form of a celt. A few edge chips along with minor scrapes and dings, but overall a nice example and rarely seen in this size. Near excellent condition with restoration to one leg; else intact and choice.An impressive example showing an elongated face, pronounced nose, almond shaped eyes, partially open mouth and attenuated arms; all classic traits of the Nayarit style. Assembled from several large original pieces with restored breaks across the face, neck and arms with paint touch ups. All are of typical form with rounded blades and flared handles. The rim of the bowl is incised with geometric patterns and the surface is a lightly burnished rich brown slip. The spout is tall and flares slightly with handles that attach to the upper shoulder. The surface is nicely burnished and has deposits along with minor scrapes and dings. Minor losses replaced and break lines restored, but appears intact. An impressive size that displays dramatically on the custom metal stand that is included. Redware construction covered with areas of burnished cream and red slip. The end of the phallus has been assembled from several original pieces with restored break lines and a small (stable) pressure crack at the rim, otherwise intact. Bat claw effigy vessels are characteristic of later (Period IV) Zapotec artistic style. Vessels of this type were used to store and transport liquids such as water and corn beer (Chicha). See Christopher Donnan's "Ceramics of Ancient Peru" page 103 for a very similar example and additional information. Highly burnished brown-ware construction with scattered deposits. Assembled from several large pieces with restored break lines. He is grasping his opponent and wields a tumi knife. Acquired via inheritance from her mother who was an artist, collector and world travler. Although referred to as 'axes', these were not made for use as weapons, but were chisels (tools) used to shape and carve stone. Also included is a stack of (10 or so) smaller pieces that have been fused together by oxidation. A wide band at the midsection shows a connected diamond pattern. Constructed of grayish terracotta, burnished overall and painted with faint wide bands (in red) around the outer edge. At the top are two stepped ridges that encircle the spout, loop handle and spherical whistles. 0 — Costa Rica 1200 AD - 1500 AD A beautifully painted 'Pataky Polychrome' tripod vessel from the Nicoya-Guanacaste region of ancient Costa Rica. Nicely knapped from black volcanic glass, these rare and fragile objects were worn as pectorals via two suspension holes. At the lower front, the lord's hands extend outward holding staffs decorated with beaded plumes. He also wears large ear spools and a beaded necklace with multi-layered tassels. Hollow, terracotta construction; it depicts a seated youth with typical gleeful expression. Polychrome painted in the 'fineline' technique with red and black against a tan slip. Townsend's "Ancient West Mexico", page 79, for similar examples and info on this type. A cylindrical bowl sits on three solid rectangular legs. The legs are hollow and contain numerous rattle balls. Light surface wear consistent with age and extended burial, but is intact and original with no repairs or restoration. Also has a few hairline age cracks, but overall the vessel is stable and complete. Substantial in size and larger than most of this type. The colors range from light blue-greens, browns-tans and gray-blacks. Constructed of light orange-tan terracotta, typical of Jama pottery. The central image is a depiction of the Maya mythological God, 'Water Lily Jaguar'. The tips of the legs are restored; otherwise intact. The nicely burnished blackware surface shows light deposits and strong root marks and trails. The light gray surface shows moderate deposits inside and out. He wears ear and nose ornaments along with a chin plug (labret). Both have rounded bodies, large loop handles and figural spouts, likely representing monkeys. The tall headwrap features a large curling, spiral plume in high relief. 00 — Peru 1000 BC - 400 BC An early Chavin brownware stirrup vessel from ancient Peru. It is similar to those found at the Shillacoto site in Huanuco. Assembled from numerous pieces with areas of replacement and significant amounts of paint enhancement. The underside is only partially restored with visible break lines. Surface shows minor wear and paint loss with light erosion, all consistent with age. Large figures of shamans, such as this one, are indicative of their high status in Jamacoaque culture and are often depicted displaying their ceremonial paraphernalia as symbols of power. Displays well on custom metal stand which is included as shown. A few imperfections but shows nice deposits and has a sharp chiseled edge. Collection of Bernard and Bernadette Lueck, Founders of the Heritage of the Americas Museum in El Cajon, California. Celt 1 (left) - Well carved from a blue-green hardstone showing fine details. A large example with an elegant form that displays beautifully. Although llamas were not native to Costa Rica, vessels like this suggest that they were certainly aware of their existence in cultures to the south. The smaller sections are abstract mythological designs. See Labbe's "Guardians of the Life Stream" for additional information on this and other types of Cocle pottery. The dipper fits perfectly into the opening atop the container. They were also cultural icons and were revered in various spiritual and fertility rites. The interior shows moderate paint loss, mostly in the center. The reverse side is completely covered with the rainfall motif. The handle is decorated with the Lambayeque deity 'Naymlap', flanked by two adornos. A finely crafted 'Tarrago Biscuit' pottery example depicting a standing camelid. The two large triangular areas depict stylized saurians (alligators), a common theme of this period. The container is a long bone, probably from a llama, and is covered with animal skin(? The resin is embedded with small shells in geometric linear and triangular patterns. The lime dipper (spatula) is also bone and is nicely carved with two human figures, the lower figure is seated, the top figure is standing. Llamas played an important role in the Inca culture and economy, providing basic needs and serving as pack animals. The interior features a row of five (5) stylized birds, with speech symbols expelling from their beaks. A small rim chip has been restored along with some minor exterior paint touch ups. The background is covered with raised dots representing rainfall. Blackware construction with a rounded body that tapers toward the bottom and topped by two conical spouts joined by a wide flat handle.

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The exterior is carved with bold angular and circular designs in vivid red and orange. 5 — Peru 250 AD - 450 AD A lovely Moche blackware stirrup vessel dating to Phase III. These hand-held stone tools were used by fishermen in the weaving and mending of fishnets. The Bat God is shown standing in a defiant pose wielding a club and ready for battle. — Costa Rica 850 AD - 1350 AD A life-sized portrait head from the greater Nicoya region, dating to Period VI. Realistically sculpted with alternating areas of smooth and textured surfaces. Finely made with very thin walled construction from orange-buff terracotta with some reddish-brown burnished slip remaining, mostly on the ring handle. The reverse medallion is similar but slightly different. The practice of 'borrowing' imagery from previous cultures is not common, but has been seen in numerous other Pre-Columbian cultures. Assembled from around a dozen original pieces with small losses replaced and break lines restored. This lovely 'Jicote Polychrome' example is of the Greater Nicoya - Pataky variety and dates to Period VI. The vibrantly painted figure is seated on a stool with hands resting on the knees. Scattered deposits and some very light surface wear. Above that is a domed platform topped by a large seated figure with hands resting on his legs. There is a large opening on the side and a small hole at the top. Nicely burnished brownware surface with light deposits inside and out. Two very small rim chips have been restored, otherwise intact and original. A lovely example with elegant form and rich brown color. A four-legged platform with a hollow inverted cone on top. 0 — Guatemala 250 BC - 250 AD A large Maya pottery vessel from the Kaminaljuyu region of Guatemala, dating to the Pre-Classic Period. 0 — West Mexico 300 BC - 300 AD A rare figural vessel from the Coahuayana Valley of Colima, West Mexico.

A style that was inspired by the northern Maya regions, it has two carved (not molded) cartouche medallions. It sits on three slotted legs, two of which still contain the original rattle balls. An attractive example that displays well on the custom metal stand which is included. The coca leaves were ingested by adding a small quantity of powdered lime (ground sea-shells) and folded into a 'quid'. This ritual was typically performed for shamanic purposes as well as to alleviate hunger and altitude sickness. The container has areas of surface loss and some missing shells, but is generally intact and complete. A very nice and well made example that is substantial in size. The most interesting aspect of this vessel is the battle scene. 5.25" tall x 6" across 5 — West Mexico 100 BC - 250 AD A well made Nayarit olla with fine-line decoration. Constructed of gray terracotta clay with areas of brown burnished surfacing.

5 — El Salvador 600 AD - 700 AD A nice Maya bowl from the Pacific slope of El Salvador. The vessel shows a nicely sculpted head and pointy tail. The plate (shallow bowl) sits on the low ring base and the underside is undecorated. Assembled from three large pieces with restored break lines and light paint enhancements. Poporo are lime containers used in the consumption of coca. This monochromatic blackware vessel has a burnished surface with linear areas more highly burnished across the snout to indicate the animal was wearing a harness (domesticated). One small spout chip has been restored, otherwise it is completely intact and original. Light surface wear and a few scrapes and dings as would be expected. The burnished blackware surface shows moderate deposits, light staining and minor weathering. A few tiny spout chips have been restored, otherwise intact. Each side of the vessel shows two relief carved figures in battle. 3.5" tall x 5" across 5 — Ecuador 1000 AD - 1500 AD A large and exceptional Manteno figural tripod vessel from Pre-Columbian Ecuador.

— West Mexico 300 BC - 300 AD A very large and beautifully painted warrior figure from Nayarit, West Mexico. Applique embellishments are typical of pottery of this region and period. There is a five inch long (stable) crack on one side, otherwise completely intact and original with no repairs or restoration. The ovoid body is more bird-like with painted designs appearing as feathers. Both arms and legs reattached with restored break lines. The circular designs represent the spots of a jaguar and are a rare feature on Paracas vessels. Assembled from original pieces; twelve (12) large shards and several smaller pieces with restored break lines. The arms are shown to the sides and the legs are tucked underneath in a kneeling position. 5 — Peru 500 AD - 800 AD A rare Wari (Huari) vessel from the Ayacucho region, South-Central Andes of ancient Peru. An elaborately sculpted depiction of the Teotihuacan 'Storm God' deity or Water God, also known as Tlaloc by numerous other cultures. Light deposits overall and a has an old collection label on the underside. In fair to good condition with one hand and several headdress ornaments replaced, a break at the waist has been restored along with minor paint enhancements. This type of ancient 'money' was used in the trading (and purchasing) of merchandise by the Inca. Each has a large nose and impressed eyes and mouth. The seated figure has an area of fire clouding on the back and a restored hand. Both are from the same estate collection; they were likely found together and appear to have been made by the same artist. The eyes and nose are sculpted in high relief with pierced nostrils and slit mouth. 0 — Peru 1100 AD - 1350 AD A lovely Chimu stirrup vessel from ancient Peru. Antara 2 (right) - A five-note flute with burnished redware surface and mineral deposits. The head, open at the top, shows a pointed snout, pierced button eyes and antlers with 3 points on each side. The surface is quite eroded with little slip remaining, rough gritty texture with some fire clouding and tan slip present. All have some red pigment and two have white pigment remaining. One has a chipped foot, otherwise they are intact and original, no restoration. The surface is heavily oxidized with a vibrant green patina. A few cracks and minor surface losses to the rear post, otherwise near choice. Displays nicely on the custom metal stand which is included. The surface is burnished blackware and has considerable deposits and mineralization. The lower chamber has a few restored breaks, otherwise it is intact and original. The lower section is a footed basin which held the burning copal incense, meant to appease the Gods. An unusual shape with round sides and flat on the front and back. 0 — Peru 500 AD - 750 AD A large Moche vessel from the northern coastal region of Peru. 0 — Panama 600 AD - 800 AD Two small Cocle pottery ollas (seed jars) from ancient Panama. Polychrome painted in reddish-brown (sienna), black and cream with a nicely burnished surface. 5" tall x 3.5" across 0 — Peru 1250 AD - 1450 AD A late Chimu, early Inca (Inka) blackware erotic vessel depicting a pair of copulating monkeys. Each depicts a squatting figure sitting atop a pedestal base. Beautifully painted in a variety of vibrant colors. Two shards reattached at the rim with restored break lines and some light paint touch ups. 0 — Ecuador 300 AD - 600 AD A gigantic Jama Coaque pottery olla dating to their Late Cutural Horizon. Shows ample manganese and mineral deposits overall, heavy in some areas. The outer edge of the spout rim has been restored in several places, otherwise completely intact and original. The foxes appear to be playfully chasing one another toward the center. The figure wears a turban type headwrap and is shown playing a four-note antara (panflute). A single restored break just below the mouthpiece, otherwise intact and original. In exceptional condition for a vessel of this size. There is one smaller hairline crack and several rim chips, otherwise completely and remarkably intact. An amazing example and rarely seen in this monumental size. Polychrome painted in white and black against red and orange. The beak is partially restorted and two small rim chips restored with minor paint touch ups, but generally intact and original. The openwork construction could indicate it was used as an incensario topper (chimney). Some minor paint touch ups but appears intact and displays well. Repeating step motifs were used in the decoration of Andean ceramics as far back as the Cupisnique period and are interpreted as stylized representations of mountains, temples, or thrones. Assembled from approximately ten original pieces with break lines restored, but appears intact and displays well. Both are of similar construction; buff terracotta partially covered with red burnished slip. The larger has some rim repairs and two legs reattached with restored breaks. Both sides are boldly painted with stylized birds in flight; executed in dark purple, black and cream against an orange background. Some surface pitting has been filled and moderate paint touch ups on the exterior. "Lord Naymlap" is the mythological founder of the pre-Chimu dynasty of the Sican-Lambayeque culture of Northern Peru. The raised platform and elaborate adornments indicates this individual is of high ranking social status. 5 — Mexico 600 AD - 900 AD A large hollow-molded Sonriente figure from the Gulf Coast, Vera Cruz (Remojadas) region of Mexico. A wide central band of incised geometric designs decorate the exterior. This type of vessel, typically called a 'frutera', has a flared pedestal base topped by a deep bowl painted with complex geometric and zoomorphic designs. Shows some light surface wear as would be expected. In one hand he holds a lime dipper (spatula) also having a human face; in the other he holds a lidded "poporo" (lime pot). Most have deposits, a few are chipped, some with red cinnabar, but generally intact and near choice. Unlike the large wooden slit drums that served as musical instruments, these rare hand-held pottery types were used ritually by shaman to induce and maintain states of trance and give them the ability to change form and move between worlds. Considerable deposits and some fire clouding, mainly on the back. Redware surface, lightly burnished with deposits and minor staining as would be expected. Excellent condition, one tiny rim chip, else intact and choice.

He sits with legs slightly bent and there is a third tripod support leg at the back. A sizable example that displays dramatically on the metal tripod ring stand which is included. It stands on four cylindrical feet and has a long banded tail that curves upward. Minor pitting, surface wear, scrapes and dings, light paint loss along with surface deposits. The loin cloth and some feather tips are partially restored along with other minor losses. Museum deaccession with inventory code written in gold ink on the bottom. At the lower back is a painted face surrounded by grid patterns, likely representing netting. Michael Cichon - "Cichon Tribal Arts" of Sarasota, Florida. For a similar example and info see page 187, photo 56 of "Between Continents-Between Seas: Precolumbian Art of Costa Rica". A cylindrical barrel (or canteen) form vessel, likely representing a drum. 5 — West Mexico 200 BC - 200 AD An extra large Michoacan olla dating to the Late Formative Period of ancient West Mexico. 0 — Peru 400 AD - 750 AD A Moche erotic vessel from the North Coast region of ancient Peru. Vessels like this are seen in painted murals being used in 'pouring rituals' relating to water worship. — Peru 250 AD - 450 AD A fine Moche bi-chrome stirrup vessel dating to Phase III. Ample deposits, and light surface wear present overall. Much like the copper hoe-money (tajaderas) that was used by the Aztecs of Mexico. They wear arm bands, elaborate (tassel-like) ear assemblages and head wraps. The standing figure has a restored hand and partially restored foot. An exceptionally rare, very closely matching pair of ancient figures. The orangeware vessel is painted overall in black and reds with complex geometric designs of linear and angular patterns. One eye is chipped otherwise completely intact with no cracks, breaks or repairs. Orange-tan pottery construction with nicely burnished surface. Approx 4.75" across & 5.75" across 5 each or 0 for both. A single restored break across the middle, else intact. Antlers on one side are partially restored, otherwise intact. Areas of mineralization and encrustation also present. An exceptional example and larger than most of this type. The basin is decorated with pointed spikes that represent the trunk of a young Ceiba tree; a sacred tree of the Maya. Matching museum inventory codes are written on each piece. Both flat panels are painted in vertical lines and waves (water motif). The lower spout has opposing loop handles that connect to the upper shoulder of the canteen. Constructed of redware terracotta with cream painted details. Of the Conti style with red and black linear decoration on an orange-tan ground. The upper body of the vessel is dome-shaped and decorated with six realistically rendered chili peppers. The monkeys are realistically sculpted and nicely detailed. Shown with hands on the knees and pierced button eyes. Divided into four panels, each decorated with a stylized bird motif along with other geometric designs. Moderate surface erosion, mostly on the bottom and along the interior rim. The Jamacoaque culture centered around the Manaba Province along the Pacific coast of ancient Ecuador. Vessel #1, Left - Tapered and stepped body with a large head and pierced nose. Repaired breaks around the neck and head, with minor losses replaced on the head. The handle is a tapered cone that is thought to represent a horn. Assembled from numerous original pieces with restored break lines and paint touch ups. An attractive example with light to moderate mineral deposits overall. Some light surface wear, minor scrapes and dings, all consistent with age. Light paint loss, surface wear and deposits present. Each has a rounded bowl, loop handles and tripod legs decorated with incised appliques. The smaller tripod is intact with light erosion and paint loss. The interior shows medium to heavy deposits and some light pitting (spalling) mostly near the bottom. He is identified as having a human face with slanted eyes and tattoos. Almost certainly he is of a person of great importance; a shaman or of the ruling elite. As is typical for this type, it depicts a standing youth with a gleeful expression. 0 — Peru 700 AD - 1500 AD A gorgeous Lambayeque whistle vessel from ancient Peru. The chocolate brown surface is nicely burnished inside and out. Assembled from around a dozen original pieces with breaks restored and some losses replaced. A rare example, the interior (tonto) is divided into three segments. The lime pot and dipper would have been used for the ingestion of Coca or other hallucinogenic substances. They reflect the belief that shamans used such instruments to travel to other realms of reality. Once covered in a red slip, most of the slip has eroded away to expose bare clay. Displays well on custom metal stand which is included as shown. A large example with an elegant form that displays beautifully. 2" across 5 each or 0 for both — Mexico 500 BC - 100 BC A lovely Chupicuaro blackware vessel. 5 — Panama 800 AD - 1000 AD A lovely Cocle polychrome plate from ancient Panama. 50 — Peru 1150 AD - 1500 AD A fine pottery 'portrait' vessel of a llama. Nicely painted in shades of red and black against a vibrant orange background, typical of the type. The figure, certainly someone of great importance, is flanked on each side by two birds in flight. The birds are carrying objects; possibly items being given as offerings to the central figure.



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